LITERACY IN YEARS 7-8


WEBSITES TO ASSIST LITERACY DEVELOPMENT

Below is a list of website that you can access to help your child with their both their reading and writing. (Some of the sites will be familiar to your child as they will use them at school). 

SPELLING LISTS

The words in the NZ Essential Spelling List are the words used most often when we write. Together they make up about 80% of most writing, so they are very important. These word have been arrange in alphabetical order and put in lists according to often they are used. Because these words are used so often it is important that we know how to spell each one.

 

Year 7 and 8's students should be spelling proficiently at  Level 4 of the New Zealand Curriculum This means

  • Year 7's should know how to spell most of the words in all lists by the end of the year
  • Year 8's should know how to spell all the words in every list by the end of the year

Please click here to access the spelling lists.

WRITING AT HOME YEAR 7

MAKE WRITING FUN

  • Encourage your child to listen for and use interesting words. Having a wide range of words will help your child create stories which will increase in complexity
  • Use technology. Text messages and emails are a form of writing even if the language is not always standard English
  • Use computers if your child isn’t keen on writing. They don’t have to think about the presentation of their work and editing does not require a complete re-write. Spell-check helps, too
  • Play card and board games and complete difficult crosswords and word puzzles
  • Create a message board such as a white board, blackboard or pin board.  The messages might be instructions, reminders, or praise for a job well done, as well as examples of work. Encourage your child and other family members to respond with messages, too.

TIP - make writing fun and use any excuse you can think of to encourage your child to write about anything, any time.

 

TALK ABOUT WRITING WITH YOUR CHILD

  • Talk with your child about their day. Talking helps them to organize their thinking and is an important first step for any writing
  • Talk about new words your child is not familiar with, using a dictionary to find out more – there are dictionaries online
  • Be a positive audience for your child. Always respond to the effort behind the message and the message content first (regardless of how the message is written) and the presentation second. Keep in mind what your child is currently learning to do and comment just on that
  • Keep a holiday journal. Before the holidays ask your child to write a list of possible activities they want to do that keep to your budget and get them to draw up an activity plan. Remember to include any events or activities you have to attend; e.g. school camp, noho marae, church, doctor, sports training, family/whānau reunion. Your child could write a list of what to pack.

TIP: Talk about what your child writes. Be interested. Use it as a way of starting conversations. Listen to your child’s opinion, even if you don’t agree with it.

 

KEEP THEM INTERESTED

  • Encourage your child to read. Reading and writing are linked and success in one is likely to lead to success in the other.
  • Buy interesting stationery for your child to use. Coloured pens and pencils can be an incentive to write together with special paper or books. Give a diary, book or notebook as a present.
  • Plan for them to be able to use a computer for writing – at home or the library.
  • Look for real reasons for writing. Encourage your child to read and write letters, messages, postcards, invitations, lists, rosters, thank-you notes, recipes, emails. Start with postcards to family and friends – encourage your family to write back.
  • Make lists for a particular reason e.g shopping lists or jobs to be completed etc.
  • Encourage your child to write on their own - on paper or on the computer. Poems, songs, waiata, short stories or a diary or journal. A journal can be a way for your child to keep track of their thoughts, ideas or a particular interest. For example, keep a journal of their sports training, kapa haka practice or compile favourite recipes.
  • It might be fun to write to a favourite author or kaumātua to ask what helps them to write their stories and compositions.

TIP: Be a great role model. Show your child that you write for lots of reasons, e.g replying to an email, writing a shopping list, invitation or letter, writing for your work or your own study. Use your first language – this helps your child’s learning, too.

 

WRITING AT HOME YEAR 8

WRITE FOR A REASON

Help your child to...

  • write a letter or an email to a newspaper editor, radio announcer or television broadcaster sharing your child’s opinion on a topic of interest in the news.
  • start a blog/wiki on the Internet and get your child to record thoughts about their day to share with their friends and family.
  • write a proverb, family motto or pepeha and illustrate it with images from the Internet or photo albums
  • develop a spreadsheet on the computer to record the progress of your child’s sports team or kapa haka group (or one they follow), including games played, performances given, penalties, scores, player/performer of the day.
  • start a writing journal to record trips and weekend activities.
  • take some photos using a digital camera and write a picture book for a younger child using the photos.
  • write a comic using drawings and graphic design to present an idea or story
  • make some birthday cards, thank you notes or letters to friends and family.

TIP: Be a great role model. Show your child that you write for lots of reasons, e.g replying to an email, writing a shopping list, invitation or letter, writing a story about your early life for your child to read.

 

MAKE WRITING FUN

Get together with your child to:

  • play strategy games and do word puzzles like word-finds and crosswords
  • make the weekly shopping list using supermarket flyers and find all the bargains and savings to fit the budget
  • write some descriptions for items you may wish to sell using the Internet
  • find out about some of your family history (whakapapa) and/or family stories (pakiwaitara) and record these stories to share with other family/whānau members.

TIP:  Make writing fun and use any excuse you can think of to encourage your child to write about anything, anytime.

 

TALK ABOUT WRITING WITH YOUR CHILD

  • Ask them about a piece of writing they are doing at school and/or for their homework
  • Tell them about some writing you are currently doing – a letter, a poem, a list for the holidays, a scrapbook, something you are doing for work or study.
  • Help them to use dictionaries and thesaurus (both paper and Internet versions).

TIP:  Talk about what your child writes. Be interested. Use it as a way of starting conversations. Listen to your child's opinion, even if you don’t agree with it.


MATHS IN YEARS 7-8


WEBSITES TO ASSIST MATH DEVELOPMENT

Below is a list of website that you can access to help your child with their math.(Some of the sites will be familiar to your child as they will use them at school). 

BASIC FACTS  YEAR 7

In Year 7 students are expected to be achieving within Level 4 of the curriculum. This means they will be achieving within Math Stage 7. Students working at this level should be working towards gaining a full understanding of the following maths basic facts knowledge.

Students will...

  • recall division basic facts up to the 10 timetable e.g. 72 divided by 8 or 56 divided by 7 etc
  • know the fraction to decimal to percentage conversion for halves, thirds, quarters, fifths and tenths e.g 3/4 = 0.75 = 75%
  • know divisibility rules for 2, 3, 5, 9 and 10 e.g 471 is divisible by 3  since 4+7+1 = 12.
  • square numbers to 100 and the corresponding roots.
  • identify factor of numbers to 100 including prime numbers e.g factors of 36 (1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9, 12, 18, 36).
  • common multiples of numbers to 10 e.g 35, 75 and 105 are common multiples of 7 and 5.

There is an exceptionally good basic facts website that you can use with your child to practice their basic facts knowledge at their level. You can also use this website to extend your students basic facts knowledge.  Please click on this link to access the website.

BASIC FACTS YEAR 8

In Year 8  students are expected to be achieving at the end of Level 4 of the curriculum. This means they will be achieving at the end of  Math Stage 7. Students working at this level will have a complete understanding of the following in regard to their maths basic facts knowledge.

Students will...

 

  • recall division basic facts up to the 10 timetable e.g. 72 divided by 8 or 56 divided by 7 etc
  • know the fraction to decimal to percentage conversion for halves, thirds, quarters, fifths and tenths e.g 3/4 = 0.75 = 75%
  • know divisibility rules for 2, 3, 5, 9 and 10 e.g 471 is divisible by 3  since 4+7+1 = 12.
  • square numbers to 100 and the corresponding roots.
  • identify factor of numbers to 100 including prime numbers e.g factors of 36 (1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9, 12, 18, 36).
  • common multiples of numbers to 10 e.g 35, 75 and 105 are common multiples of 7 and 5.

There is an exceptionally good basic facts website that you can use with your child to practice their basic facts knowledge at their level. You can also use this website to extend your students basic facts knowledge.  Please click on this link to access the website.