LITERACY IN YEARS 3-6


WEBSITES TO ASSIST IN LITERACY DEVELOPMENT

  • For a link to 50 different recommended texts for year 3 click here.  You can use this info to find them in the library.  Please use discretion over the titles and content. 
  • Kids  News: click here
  • Sunshine online. A login is required which is provided by school: click here
  • Sunshine classics. A login is required which provided by school: click here

TIPS FROM THE TEACHERS

  • For a good book to read ask a librarian. The librarians at the Pukekohe library are amazing!!! Don't forget to ask them for help to choose appropriate texts! 
  • Have a child who would rather watch a movie? Then turn the sound off and the subtitles on. That’s reading!
  • Encourage your children to read whatever type of text they are interested in: it could be book or magazine or comic or website or non-fiction factual book or picture book or a newspaper. If its got words on it its reading!
  • Ask questions about what your child reads.  Who, what, where, why, when. This helps them to re-phrase texts and develops comprehension skills such as inference.
  • Get them to explain in their own words what they are reading.  This helps them to summarize what they are reading and builds comprehension skills.

SPELLING LISTS

The words in the NZ Essential Spelling List are the words used most often when we write. Together they make up about 80% of most writing, so they are very important. These word have been arrange in alphabetical order and put in lists according to often they are used. Because these words are used so often it is important that we know how to spell each one.

  • Year 4 students who are spelling proficiently at Level 2 of the curriculum will be able to spell most words in Lists 1-4.
  • Year 5 students who are spelling proficiently at Level 3 of the curriculum will be able to spell most words in Lists 1-5.
  • Year 6 students who are spelling proficiently  at Level 3 of the curriculum will be able to spell most words in Lists 1-6.

Please click here to access the spelling lists.

 

WRITING AT HOME FOR YEAR 4

WRITE FOR FUN

  • Writing about their heroes, sports events, tīpuna (ancestors), hobbies and interests helps your child to stay interested in what they are writing about
  • Help your child to leave messages in sand on the beach, send a message in a bottle, do code crackers, word puzzles, crosswords, word finds – these are all fun to do together
  • Make up a story or think of a pakiwaitara (legend) and act it out with costumes and music. Write down the names of the characters or tīpuna (ancestors)
  • If you or someone in your family has a computer, encourage your child to use it to write, email and publish or print for pleasure (emails, birthday cards, poems, jokes, letters, pictures with captions). Or you could use a computer at the library.

TIP: Keep writing fun and use any excuse you can think of to encourage your child to write about anything, any time.

 

TALK ABOUT YOUR CHILD'S WRITING

  • Get your child to talk about their writing and share it
  • Cut out words and letters to make stories, codes, poems, puzzles and more…
  • Play word games together
  • Play with words. Thinking of interesting words and discussing new ones can help increase the words your child uses when they write – look words up in the dictionary or on the Internet or talk with family/whānau to find out more about where the words come from.

TIP: Talk about what your child writes. Be interested. If you don’t understand what their story is about, ask them to tell you more about it. Use questions they will want to answer.

 

WRITE FOR A REASON

  • Get your child to help write the shopping list, invitation lists for family events, menus for special dinners, thank-you cards when someone does something nice
  • Postcards are a good size for a sentence or two and they are cheap to post, too. Have a special place to keep your child’s writing at home (notice board, fridge, folder). You might frame a piece of writing and hang it up, too.

TIP: Be a great role model. Show your child that you write for all sorts of reasons. Let them see you enjoying writing. Write to them sometimes, too. You can use your first language – this helps your child’s learning, too.

 

WRITING AT HOME FOR YEAR 5

MAKE WRITING FUN

  • Help your child write about their heroes, sports events, tïpuna (ancestors), hobbies and interests. This helps them stay interested in what they are writing about.
  • Play word games and do puzzles together to help your child learn more about words and spelling.
  • Have interesting paper and pens available or help them make a special book to write in.
  • Write to your child, or give them jokes, cartoons or short articles you think they’ll like to read from the newspaper
  • Play with words. Thinking of interesting words and discussing new ones can help increase the words your child uses when they write – look words up in the dictionary or on the Internet, or talk to family and whānau members to learn more about the background and the whakapapa (origins) of the words.

TIP: Be a great role model. Show your child that you write for all sorts of reasons. Let them see you enjoy writing. You can use your first language – this helps your child’s learning, too.

 

TALK ABOUT YOUR CHILD'S WRITING

  • Talk about ideas and information they are going to write about. Talk about experiences, diagrams, graphs, pictures, photos and material that your child is planning to use for school work. Discussing the information and main ideas can help their planning for writing and their understanding, too.
  • Share enjoyment of their writing. Read and talk about the writing that your child does. Give praise for things they have done well to support their learning.
  • Play with words. Thinking of interesting words and discussing new ones can help increase the words your child uses when they write
  • Share your own writing with your child – lists, planning for family events or an email. You can help them to see that you too use writing for different purposes.

TIP: Keep writing fun, use any excuse you can think of to encourage your child to write about anything, anytime.

 

WRITE FOR A REASON

  • Encourage your child to write emails, invitations, thank you letters, poems, stories or postcards to friends, family and whänau – make it fun.
  • Ask your child who they would like to write to. It is helpful if what they write is given or sent to others.
  • Ask them to write a story to read to a younger sibling
  • A diary or journal – on paper or on a computer – can help your child to write about their experiences and their own feelings about things that have happened at school, at home, in the world, on the marae, at sports events and on TV.

TIP: Talk about what your child writes. Be interested. If you don’t understand something they are writing about, ask them to explain.

WRITING AT HOME FOR YEAR 6

MAKE WRITING FUN

  • Encourage your child to write about their heroes, tīpuna (ancestors), sports events, hobbies and interests to help keep them interested in what they are writing about
  • Play word games and do puzzles together. Games and puzzles such as crosswords, tongue twisters and word puzzles help build your child’s knowledge of words, spelling, thinking and planning skills
  • Start a blog about a family interest. Find a topic you’re both interested in and set up your own blog.

TIP: Be a great role model. Show your child that you write for all sorts of reasons. Let them see you enjoying writing. Use your first language – this helps your child’s learning, too.

 

WRITE FOR A REASON

Encourage your child to write:

  • Suggest your child is responsible for the weekly shopping list, equipment list for weekends away and holidays, task lists for the week
  • Encourage your child to write to others - emails, letters, texts, postcards. It will help if some of what your child writes about is for others
  • Short stories or a journal – on paper or on a computer – can help them to write about their experiences and their own feelings about things that have happened at school, in their family, on the marae, in the world, at sports events and on TV
  • Report on a new baby or pet addition to the family. This might be a slide show, scrapbook, page on the computer
  • Make an argument in writing for a special request – trip, event, present etc
  • Draw up written contracts for agreed jobs e.g Every day I will…(make my bed, do one lot of dishes, and when I complete the contract I can choose…).

TIP: Keep writing fun, use any excuse you can think of to encourage your child to write about anything, anytime.

 

TALK ABOUT YOUR CHILD'S WRITING

  • Talk about ideas and information they are going to write about. Talk about experiences, diagrams, graphs, photos, treasures and taonga, waiata, pictures, whakapapa and material that your child is planning to use for school work. Discussing the information and main ideas can help their planning for writing and their understanding, too
  • Share enjoyment of their writing. Read and talk about the writing that your child does. Give praise for things they have done well and say what you liked and why – this all supports their learning
  • Play with words. Thinking of interesting words and discussing new ones can help increase the words your child uses when they write – look words up in the dictionary or on the Internet to find out more about what they mean. Talk to family and whānau members to learn more about the background and the whakapapa (origins) of the words
  • Share your own writing with your child – lists, planning for family events, song lyrics or letters and emails. You can help them to see that you too use writing for different purposes.

TIP: Talk about what your child writes. Be interested. Use it as a way of starting conversations. Listen to their opinion, even if you don’t agree with it.

 


MATHS IN YEARS 3-6


WEBSITES TO ASSIST IN NUMERACY DEVELOPMENT

  • To access Sumdog click here. It is free to sign up and has great maths games and online practice
  • To watch a helpful timetable video click here.

TIPS FROM THE TEACHER 

  • The app store has a good range of games that help build number knowledge - for example, the apple ‘Sushi Monsters’ helps build multiplication skills.

BASIC FACTS YEAR 4

In Year 4 students are expected to be achieving at the end of  Level 2 of the curriculum. This means they will be achieving at Math stage 5. Students  working at this level should know the following in regard to their maths basic facts knowledge.

Students will...

  • know addition facts to 20 and subtraction facts to 10 e.g 7+5 or 8+7 and  9-6 or 8-4 etc.
  • multiplication facts for the 2, 5 and 10 timetables and their corresponding division facts .
  • multiples of 100 that add to 1000 e.g 300 and 700 or 100 and 900.

There is an exceptionally good basic facts website that you can use with your child to practice their basic facts knowledge at their level. You can also use this website to extend your students basic facts knowledge.  Please click on this link to access the website.

BASIC FACT YEAR 5

In Year 5 students are expected to be achieving within Level 3 of the curriculum. This means they will be achieving within Math stage 6. Students working at this level should be working towards gaining a full understanding of the following maths basic facts knowledge.

Students will...

  • recall addition and subtraction facts up to 20 e.g 9+5 and 13-7 etc
  • know their multiplication basic facts up to the 10 times table and some corresponding division facts.
  • multiplication basic facts with tens hundreds and thousands e.g  10 x 100 = 1000 or 100 x 100 = 10,000

There is an exceptionally good basic facts website that you can use with your child to practice their basic facts knowledge at their level. You can also use this website to extend your students basic facts knowledge.  Please click on this link to access the website.

BASIC FACTS YEAR 6

IYear 6  students are expected to be achieving at the end of Level 3 of the curriculum. This means they will be achieving within Math stage 6. Students working at this level will have a complete understanding of the following in regard to their maths basic facts knowledge.

Students will...

  • recall addition and subtraction facts up to 20 e.g 9+5 and 13-7 etc
  • know their multiplication basic facts up to the 10 times table and some corresponding division facts.
  • multiplication basic facts with tens hundreds and thousands e.g  10 x 100 = 1000 or 100 x 100 = 10,000

There is an exceptionally good basic facts website that you can use with your child to practice their basic facts knowledge at their level. You can also use this website to extend your students basic facts knowledge.  Please click on this link to access the website.